Tag Archives: job

When The Risk Is Worth The Gain

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“If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try.” – Seth Godin

We’ve heard countless times over how it’s better to risk than to wonder.

Over a year and a half ago, I picked up my life and moved to New York City. The more surprising part of the story is that I’d never stepped foot in New York once before moving, nor did I know anyone living here. It was the epitome of embarking on a journey into the unknown.

In a city of over 8 million people, I had me, myself and I.

Looking back now, I realize I was building a life I had not only dreamed of, but a life that would prepare me for all the decisions that would come once I arrived. I was inherently an
independent person. I’ve always been comfortable with handling change and I’ve always been the type to choose the bigger adventure.

There was no calling home if I was lost. I couldn’t expect to come home to Mom’s homemade dinner, and no matter how crazy things got, there was no turning back.

In the world of public relations, calculated risks are what prepare us to stand out amongst the crowd. You make decisions that you could fail at, no matter how strategic they may seem ahead of time.

I look at this journey as one of success. I moved out of my home country at 22, ready to build a life of my own. I was building a foundation in an unfamiliar world, but creating a life I’d always wanted – and I wasn’t going to stop.

In a matter of weeks I knew I’d found home. I found a city that fed off of hard work and
determination. I found like-minded individuals who went out of their comfort zone to prove something to the world – that they too were capable of great things.

I’m writing this post to not only reflect, but to also encourage anyone sitting at a crossroads wondering which decision to make. I had the option to stay in Toronto, start my career off an hour away from home, and be happy with wherever that led. For me, that was the easy choice. That was the lesser of the risk and it felt safe.

If I can give any piece of advice for young professionals, it would be to choose the riskier option. Uproot your life for the unknown, because on the other side is a world that will teach you
everything you need to know about challenges, fear and failure. But more importantly, on the other side of that risk is opportunity.

Two weeks ago I started as a Senior Account Executive at Clarity PR in New York City.

I did it.

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Your Job, Your Choice.

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Seth Godin once said, “Instead of wondering when your next vacation is, maybe you should set up a life you don’t need to escape from.”

The more I read, and reread that quote, the more it becomes entrenched in my brain as an idea that everyone should live by, hanging on to each word as a true testament for living the life we actually dream of living. Why?

We live in a world where the majority of our time is spent at work. Making money, paying bills, and living in a sea of college debt. I’m going to guess that 80 percent of our time is spent
working in order to live comfortably, while the other 20 percent of the time is spent doing things that we feel rewards us for all our hard “work”.

For some of us, that 20 percent is spent on a beach in the Caribbean, while for others it’s being at home where we can hypothetically relax, unwind and not think about… you guessed it, work.

Godin has a point, though. What are we escaping from, and what decision did we make that put us in a position where we feel we need to “get away” from the life we created?

In a conversation I had with my Dad over the weekend, he brought up the recent pool of
applicants entering the job field – millennials. In other words, yours truly. He had a subtle
trepidation about the number of incoming resumes with what some might call, career jumpers. Five months here, three months at XYZ, and seven months working abroad. Not to mention the switch from Finance to Fashion to Food Security.

With great curiosity, he inquired not only about job stability, but also about candidate
trustworthiness, fearful of how quickly someone can walk away from a permanent position. My response seemed to be somewhat defensive, but truly reflective of the society I’ve been brought up in.

In honest fashion, I told him if he was looking for someone who would be there long term to try increasing the number of years of experience required for the position — inevitably an older
applicant. The difference between hiring someone from Gen Y and Gen X is substantial, it just depends on what the job is and what the position means internally for the company.

Gen Y has been raised by Gen X, living with the hope that we can grow up and land our dream job – and we really believe it. That doesn’t mean we are going to end every job within a few months, unsatisfied with the position, reluctant about the field and angry about the pay.

However, we are naturally drawn to expect more from the companies we get hired by, and if we feel unfit or unhappy by the position, we aren’t afraid to make a change. We’ve begun to
understand that the 80 percent of our time is valuable. Too many times we see individuals land in a position, working countless hours for something they actually hate. They’re unhappy, but
reluctant to make a change.

I think the greater mistake is not recognizing you have the potential to control your own
happiness, and find a job that doesn’t have to be called work. Of course you’ll have some days where you can’t wait for the day to end – but don’t settle for that on the everyday. Ultimately, we want to be recognized for the talent that we have, instead of filling a job that really is meant for someone else. In my opinion, this is just a natural progression of the job market.

Maybe I am just optimistic, but at the same time, you can’t fit a square peg in a round hole.

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